THERE ARE 4 SIMPLE RULES TO FOLLOW WHEN DESIGNING A GREAT AD:
 
 
1. USE SIMPLE LAYOUTS
 
 The most effective ads tend to be relatively simple. Headlines are short, powerful, and to the point, and the image tells the story quickly. A company that uses a simple layout effectively is RIM, the maker of the BlackBerry. The current double page ad combines photography with whimsical design: on the left page, the popular handheld is shown as an owl sitting in a tree. To the right, the headline reads,“Berry well informed” and the bodycopy, which is easy-to-read, uses few words to explain the benefits of wirelesse-mail. wireless e-mail device.

2. KEEP BODY COPY LEGIBLE

Typography and design can get your message across – or get in the way, Rock The Mike Productions uses statistical research to show how illegible typography significantly lowers reader comprehension – and sales. A great example are direct mail letters. Direct mail letters have short blocks of copy, bulleted lists, and frequent indentations. These things make the copy easy-to-read, and copy that gets read is copy that increases sales image. White copy placed over a picture of white daisies. I have no clue what the copy said because I couldn’t read it. The white letters were lost in the flowers font. research, more than five times as many readers are likely to show better comprehension when a serif font is used versus a sans serif font. (You are reading a serif font.) Using large blocks of intimidating Direct mail experts figured Placing copy over a “busy” I once saw an ad that had Using a sans serif versus serif.

3. DESIGN ADS WITH OPTIMAL “FLOW”

We read from top to bottom and left to right. In fact, according to typographer Edmund Arnold, the  eyes fall naturally to the top left corner of a page and then move across and down. Ads that make the reader fight this natural tendency lower comprehension – by almost 50%. Plus, they are annoying.
 
4 . “WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME?”
 
When writing ad copy, be specific. Explain how your product or service will benefit your reader. Eliminate technical jargon – even if you think your reader understands it – and down play hype such as “industry leader,”“leading edge,” “the best,” etc. Designing and writing print ads that get read isn’t difficult if you know the basic rules for grabbing and holding your reader’s attention. Proper design elements that aid reader comprehension, and benefitdriven copy will help you get your message across clearly – and increase sales in the process.

 
 
 
 
 

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